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Our Collection of Children's Songs


Learn with Music

Playing with Music at Home: Tips to explore music and connect it to children's learning

10 Ways Babies Learn When We Sing to Them: Listening skills, new words, and so much more

 

Featured Artists and Songs

This month features fun songs about nature! Be sure to come back each month to hear a new selection of children's music—and don't miss the growing archive of children's songs.

Bloom

Kira Willey

 
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Tell us about your music:  As a yoga teacher as well as a recording artist, I create two-in-one albums that blend upbeat, danceable music with get-up-and-move yoga inspiration. The original songs on my CDs are followed by bonus yoga tracks which feature easy-to-follow yoga instructions to the music. My songs have sweet, happy themes; I try to express the wonder that children feel about the natural world.  

Tell us about your song (e.g., any unique instruments used, the origins of the lyrics, what inspired you, etc.):  I came up with the bouncy, happy chord progression on the ukulele one day, and it just felt like something growing. I thought of the title “Bloom” and remembered how fun watching something growing out of the earth can be. The song came easily after that. I describe the fascinating sights and smells of the garden from a child’s perspective.

What I hope children, teachers, and families get from this song:  I hope children and families become inspired to plant something and watch it grow—whether in a garden or on their windowsill. And I hope the song makes them smile!

 
© Kira Willey
Tallest Tree

Recess Monkey

 
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Tell us about your music:  The band members are all teachers, so we're constantly surrounded by child-driven ideas. We think about our songs thematically and write with every family member in mind. Our songs are as eclectic as our themes and lyrics—we enjoy exploring various genres, feelings, and textures. We like the unexpected energy of blending hip-hop with bluegrass, funk with new wave, and everything in between.  

Tell us about your song (e.g., any unique instruments used, the origins of the lyrics, what inspired you, etc.):  “Tallest Tree” is a 2013 album we wrote imagining we were stranded on an island for without any electricity. The instruments in “Tallest Tree” essentially abide by that idea: ukulele, 12-string guitar, acoustic bass, and drums comprise the majority of the song. The sonic limitations of operating without electricity helped transport us to a different place musically and helped define the desert island setting.

What I hope children, teachers, and families get from this song:  The song is about both the literal experience of journeying through the woods and also the universal experience of shifting your perspective to appreciate the majesty around you. We cherish the hours we spent outdoors exploring nature as children, and we encourage other children to embark on childhood discovery.

© Recess Monkey
http://www.recessmonkey.com

Rainy Day

Milkshake

 
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Tell us about your music:  Milkshake likes to make music children can call their own, exploring topics like pretend play, the ups and downs of friendships, and bullies. Even though each of the Milkshake bandmates have rock ‘n’ roll roots, we love mixing up musical genres. Children aren’t one-dimensional, and neither is the Milkshake band.  

Tell us about your song (e.g., any unique instruments used, the origins of the lyrics, what inspired you, etc.):  Lisa Mathews was inspired to write a rainy day song because she loves walking in the rain. Most people don’t realize there’s a whole set of fun things to do when the rain comes down (besides listening to the lovely sound of raindrops). As a child, Lisa loved playing in the mud. She crafted towns for Matchbox cars or made muddy muffins for her dolls.

What I hope children, teachers, and families get from this song:  Since the song is very sing-along friendly and easy to remember, we hope children and families sing it whenever the rain comes down. And we hope they go out in the rain together, playing and enjoying the different—often wonderful—atmosphere a rainy day gives us.

© Milkshake
Yuki (Snow)

Elizabeth Mitchell

 
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Tell us about your music: Elizabeth Mitchell weaves musical landscapes that seem like a patchwork of memories. Mitchell’s extended family band, You Are My Flower, including daughter Storey and husband Daniel Littleton creates a sound that celebrates family, imagination and love. 

About your song (e.g., any unique instruments used, the origins of the lyrics, what inspired you, etc.): Our dear friend Mizuyo Aburano (aka Mimi), taught us this Japanese song when we were looking for a winter song. The second verse, which we don’t sing in English here, is about dogs running outside happily in the snow, and cats curled up inside by a kotatsu (a Japanese heating table). We love this cheerful and sweet song so much that we named our dog Yuki!

© Elizabeth Mitchell
http://youaremyflower.org/

Compost

Earthworm Ensemble

 
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Tell us about your music:  We make children's music for the whole family to enjoy and hope our lyrics inspire family conversations about keeping our earth green. We often focus on ecological topics like home gardening, farmer's markets, composting, ladybugs and earthworms, and even dinosaurs.  

Tell us about your song (e.g., any unique instruments used, the origins of the lyrics, what inspired you, etc.):  “Compost” is our first song that's kind of bluesy! We usually do folk and folk-rock songs, but we thought it would be fun to try and emulate classic bluesman John Lee Hooker. The lyrics describe how to compost even in a small space, and depict the role of microorganisms in turning table scraps and leaves into rich soil. Lead vocals are by Rob Waller (of the band I See Hawks In L.A. All four Hawks are on the song).

What I hope children, teachers, and families get from this song:  Learning how to compost! Save those kitchen scraps!

 
© Earthworm Ensemble
Thingamajig

Lucky Diaz and the Family Jam Band

 
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Tell us about your music:  Our sound mixes Modern pop twists with retro styling —catchy, danceable, and fun. Our music is jam-packed with meaningful, empowering lyrics.  

Tell us about your song (e.g., any unique instruments used, the origins of the lyrics, what inspired you, etc.):  We're so excited that Thingamajig (from the album Lishy Lou and Lucky Too) is NAEYC's Week of the Young Child's Music Monday song!  The inspiration for this song was a book that highlighted unusual words that people no longer use.  One of these words, "Thingamajig" became the song title.  Other words like “curmudgeon” and “charlatan” we used with the song itself.

What I hope children, teachers, and families get from this song:  We hope listeners will have fun with the song and make up their own lyrics using unusual words that strike their fancy.  

 
 
© Lucky Diaz